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Research

Health

There has never been a more opportune time for researchers, engineers, clinicians and entrepreneurs to contribute to the development of health technology for the purpose of lowering costs and improving the quality of care. Our programs and partnerships bridge boundaries between engineers and health-care practitioners by integrating research, student projects, clinical practice and commercialization to train leaders in healthcare innovation. The new technological solutions being developed in our labs will help improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare while reducing costs.

UW Mechanical Engineering has a rich history of advancements in biomechanics and health technologies, thanks to the work of pioneers in the field, including emeritus faculty Colin Daly and Albert Kobayashi and alumni Wayne Quinton and Savio Woo. Today, nearly half of ME’s core faculty research in this area.

Key research areas

  • Assistive design technology and accessible design
  • Biomechanics, biotechnologies and human movement
  • Bio-microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMs), cell mechanics and nanotechnology
  • Blood, tissue and organ interaction
  • Cryopreservation and biobanking technologies
  • Innovation in health and biomedical device development
  • Nano and biologically inspired robotics
  • Photonics – diagnostic imaging, surgical guidance and laser therapy
  • Point-of-care diagnostics
  • Prosthetics, orthoses and exoskeletons

Research highlights

ME researchers are advancing cancer detection and treatment through innovations in nanorobotics, optical technologies and biomedical diagnostics.

Engineering Innovation in Health is a year-long program in which engineering students and faculty partner with clinicians to design medical devices aimed toward lowering costs and improving care.

Focused on amplifying human and robotic interaction, the AMP Lab advances understanding of the dynamics and control of movement to design treatment strategies and assistive technologies that improve function and quality of life.

ME’s 15-year partnership with the Seattle VA’s Center for Limb Loss and MoBility has resulted in hands-on research opportunities for students and has helped propel UW biomechanics research in new directions.

Award-winning student projects

MedsForAll, an affordable alternative to the epinephrine auto-injectors currently on the market, developed for communities worldwide.

MistEase, a device that makes it easier for elderly people with glaucoma to administer their eye drops.

PlayGait™, a pediatric exoskeleton that helps children with gait disorders walk more, so they can build muscle strength and increase independent mobility.

Related News

A banner that says "health innovation challenge" and a lot of screenshots from video chats

Fri, 03/05/2021 | UW Foster School Blog

ME teams take prizes at 2021 Hollomon Health Innovation Challenge

ME health innovation was on display at the 2021 Hollomon Challenge. Five teams with ME members - Under Pressure, OsmoProcessor, Direct Dose, EVBreathe and Mask Seal Testing - won prizes for their innovative ideas. Eight of the 21 finalist teams included members from ME and the five new prizes brings the department's total to eleven prizes in the competition since 2016.

a still photo of a beating heart tissue against a red background with illustrated hearts

Mon, 02/08/2021

Engineering that tugs at the heartstrings

UW researchers engineer miniature beating heart tissues that allow them to study a range of topics in human health.

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Thu, 12/17/2020

NIH backs UW effort to RESTRICT the spread of HIV

With new support from NIH, researchers are continuing development on a test designed to combat HIV.

Jae-Hyun Chung

Fri, 11/13/2020 | WE-REACH

Chung wins WE-REACH funding for COVID-19 rapid diagnostics

Jae-Hyun Chung is developing a portable COVID-19 test using an innovative nanotube sensor-based technology.